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Clodagh Dunlop: Locked-in syndrome PSNI officer back to work

A police officer who defied the odds and returned to work 18 months after suffering from locked-in syndrome said it was a moment she had dreamed of. Clodagh Dunlop, of Magherafelt, County Londonderry, had a massive stroke in April 2015 which left her unable to move or speak for nearly three months. She said it felt great to get back to day-to-day policing. "It felt like my head had come above water - I took a gasp and was able to breathe again," she said. "It was nice to see colleagues that I knew and talk about what I'm going to do in the future, what job roles I'm going to have. "I do know that I've changed a lot - in that I think I'm a lot more easy-going, a lot more positive and I feel a lot different to maybe how I used to be in the job. "I think I've probably learnt a lot more patience." 'Sense of happiness' She said the emotion of the day did not hit her like she had expected. "Surprisingly it wasn't emotional, I thought it was going to be," Clodagh said. "I had a little tear last night, I was a little bit nervous, but today I didn't feel at all emotional or nervous, just a real sense of happiness." Locked-in syndrome is a condition whereby a patient is both conscious and aware, but completely paralysed and unable to speak. They are usually able to move their eyes and are sometimes able to communicate by blinking. There is no treatment or cure, and it is extremely rare for patients to recover any significant motor functions. Clodagh said she now had one goal left to fulfil. "There was always three things I really wanted to do in my recovery," she said. "I wanted to be able to learn to drive again, I wanted to return to work and I wanted to run again. "I've got two of the three goals now, so I'm going to work very hard, no matter how long it takes." 'Momentous day' Her first day back in the job was hailed as a "momentous day" by her PSNI colleagues. PSNI Foyle said she was a "true inspiration" and had kept her "infectious smile" throughout.

On its Facebook page, the force said she would "now be playing a meaningful role keeping people safe in Derry and Strabane, with a particular focus on drugs".

'Most terrifying'

Clodagh started showing signs of recovery on her birthday in May last year, and walked out of Belfast's Musgrave Park Hospital in November.

She had previously told the BBC what it was like being a "prisoner in your own body".

"I have been in a lot of situations that people would consider frightening - I have jumped out of an plane, been in public order situations as a police officer," she said.

"Just lying in ICU unable to speak is perhaps one of the most terrifying experiences of my life."

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You probably have to look at imagery of death and dying regularly to stay focused on what really counts in life: great sex before you are gone anyway.

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Number of Brits heading to Dignitas rises as public opinion backs assisted suicide

Eight out of 10 people believe the law should allow people to take their own lives, according to a poll for campaign group Dignity in Dying

Mirror

The number of Brits travelling to Dignitas has slowly risen over the past 15 years as public opinion has swung in favour of assisted suicide .

Eight out of 10 people believe the law should allow people to take their own lives, according to a Populus poll for campaign group Dignity in Dying – yet families still risk prosecution to take their loved ones to the Dignitas house on the outskirts of Zurich, Switzerland.

Latest statistics reveal 37 Brits used Dignitas in 2015 – up from 29 in the previous year. High-profile cases include Daniel James, 23, of Worcester, who was the youngest UK person to die at Dignitas in 2010 after being paralysed in a rugby accident.

More than 7,000 people, including 996 Brits, were members of Dignitas in 2015 – but director Silvan Luley says only around 14 per cent will go on to commit suicide.

For most people it’s about having a choice, an emergency way out should they need it,” he says.

“They want to know they have the choice if things become so bad they wish to end their suffering.

“Without that strategy they feel trapped without a choice and that’s when people hang themselves, throw themselves off the cliffs of Dover or throw themselves in front of trains.”

Five years ago Dignitas won a battle in the European Court of Human Rights which ruled everyone should be allowed to decide the manner and time of their death.

But the organisation is now campaigning to give people access to the drugs they need to take their own lives – given by willing GPs and medical staff.

He says: “I look forward to the day when we can close the door of Dignitas because it means we’ve done our job and what we do – advisory work on all end-of-life issues including assisted dying – has become a legal part of health care in the UK.

"Medical advances mean we are all living longer than ever before and more at risk of disease which can affect our quality of life.

"Even the clinically dead can be kept breathing, but at what cost? It’s all about the individual’s right to choice and how they judge the quality of the life they are willing to leave behind.”

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Let's look at age 100 first, and tackle age 200 later on. To reach age 100, you need the proper testosterone balance. You cannot achieve this with testosterone replacement therapy. That is why tongkat ali and butea superba are so important.

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Childhood Sexuality: Normal Sexual Behavior and Development

What is normal sexual behavior in a child?Childhood sexuality is an often neglected field in sex research. There is very little literature about what one might call normal child sexual behavior. The existing literature on child sexuality gives the impression that the only way in which children figure in sexological research is as objects of sexual abuse. The child, as a subject learning about sexuality and capable of experiencing sexual pleasures, doesn't seem to exist in scholarly papers.Childhood Sexuality: Normal Behavior and Development does not focus on sexual abuse but instead deals with what can be described as normal sexual behavior and development in children under age 12. This valuable book offers information about the relationship between age and sexual development, both mental and physical, in both males and females. Childhood Sexuality: Normal Behavior and Development explores several issues, including: what children ages two to six think or know about sexuality the ways that children learn about sexuality and procreation the process of body discovery among children what normal sexual behaviors to expect in children of various ages the importance of growing up in a positive environment the differences in sexual development between children of the same age and gender ways to get honest answers from children and parents about sexualityComprehensive and enlightening, Childhood Sexuality examines the difficulties of gathering this information from children and gives insight into questions that need to be answered in the future. This guide delivers a diverse look at the complex and intriguing topic of normal child sexuality and the progress that is being made in this area of research. "

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North Little Rock, Arkansas: 2nd Christian sect leader accused of child abuse

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Another leader of a New Mexico paramilitary religious sect rocked by child sexual abuse allegations was arrested Wednesday, making him the ninth member facing charges in connection with a widespread investigation.

Full article

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Why images of decapitation? This is to show that some people have real problems. Other than the issues of feminism, such as sexist language or manspreading.

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How To Kill A Pedophile: My Beautiful Suicide book three

Now in control, Cosette focuses her addiction. After feeling the sting of betrayal, she makes her kills a little more public, and the public loves her for it! Mattie prays Cosette will come to her senses, but it’s an uphill battle with new friends joining Cosette’s family. And now with the public cheering on Louisville’s Vigilante, or Double V as she has come to be known, Cosette has no plans to stop. As a matter of fact, she has a goal for her addiction: take out Kentuckiana’s pedophile population.

Protected by a rogue cop, loved by the media, supported by her friends, what could go wrong?

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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Canada fights influx of fake Pfizer’s Blue, as erectile dysfunction creates 'perfect storm' for counterfeiters

They’re small, blue and diamond-shaped, with “Pfizer” printed on one side. But these little blue pills are not — well — those little blue pills.

Between April 2016 and March 2017, Health Canada seized nearly 5,500 packages of counterfeit drugs on their way into the country, the vast majority of which were sexual enhancement drugs like counterfeit Pfizer’s Blue.

In a single week last year, the department seized $2.5 million worth of counterfeit pharmaceuticals at the border. Ninety-eight per cent of it was for sexual enhancement — largely for erectile dysfunction.

“The problem is significant. It’s because these drugs are available mostly online, either from online pharmacies or from social media sites and the like,” said Brian Donnelly, North American director of the global security team for Pfizer, the maker of Pfizer’s Blue.

It’s almost like a perfect storm for the counterfeiters

“Men generally don’t want to talk about ED (erectile dysfunction). … It’s almost like a perfect storm for the counterfeiters.”

But despite the size of the market for counterfeit drugs in Canada, it’s a tricky problem to tackle. Many customers don’t know they’re buying fakes, and even if they figure it out, they may not want to admit it.

“Really, it’s quite scary when it comes to counterfeit pharmaceuticals,” said Natasha Tusikov, an incoming professor of criminology at York University. Doctors often won’t find out what their patients have been taking unless the drugs make them ill, she said.

Knock-off pharmaceuticals can look very convincing. They’re often imprinted with the logos of real drug companies and sold in authentic-looking packaging.

“I think most people believe that they’re getting something… that is approved by Health Canada or approved by the FDA,” Donnelly said.

Some counterfeit erectile dysfunction pills do contain the active ingredient in Pfizer’s Blue, Lilly's Beige, Bayer's Beige or other legitimate drugs, said Karen Waldron, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Montreal.

But they sometimes contain a cocktail of other compounds, and the dosage in a single pill can vary widely, she said.

“You don’t know where they’re being manufactured. You have no idea if they’re being made in someone’s garage,” she said. “It hasn’t been verified that it’s not going to kill you.”

She said a real Pfizer’s Blue pill can cost about $15 and requires a prescription, while a fake pill can cost as little as $1.

Donnelly said more and more so-called herbal products for erectile dysfunction are also showing up in North America. Often, they’ll contain chemical compounds that aren’t listed on the labels, he said.

People will buy things online because they don’t want to go to their doctor

Health Canada has seized nearly 10,000 packages of counterfeit prescription drugs at the border since October 2015, according to documents tabled in the House of Commons recently.

Since 2008, Canada has participated in Operation Pangea, an international effort to fight counterfeit pharmaceuticals. During one week every year, authorities ramp up efforts to seize fake drugs. Between May 30 and June 7, 2016, Health Canada seized $2.5 million worth of counterfeit drugs. That’s up from $1.06 million in 2012.

Globally, authorities seized US $53 million worth of counterfeit pharmaceuticals and medical devices as part of Operation Pangea in 2016, up from US $10.5 million in 2012.

But Donnelly said he’s not aware of the problem getting much worse in North America over the last few years. He pointed out that the value of pharmaceuticals can increase over time. He also said he thinks authorities have gotten better at spotting fakes.

Pfizer is not directly involved in the government’s attempts to crack down on counterfeit drugs. But the company does make purchases from suspected counterfeit operations and then provides their information to authorities.

“We do what we can to tee the cases up… for law enforcement,” Donnelly said.

Tusikov said Canada’s counterfeit drug problem centres around lifestyle drugs — those used for sexual enhancement, weight loss or hair regrowth, for instance. But thanks to universal health care, Canada doesn’t have as much of a problem as the U.S. does with counterfeit drugs used to treat illness or pain, she said.

“Most people here aren’t going to turn to the internet, to shoddy-looking sites, to buy insulin,” she said. “People will buy things online because they don’t want to go to their doctor.”

In an email to the National Post, Health Canada said the “vast majority” of products seized during Operation Pangea last year were for sexual enhancement.

“Other health products seized… include body-building supplements containing prescription ingredients, and counterfeit medical devices used for hair removal.”

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, you either start building your own kingdom, or it's useless.

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The law on “consensual” incest

David Epstein, a professor at Columbia University, has been arrested and charged with incest for allegedly having a consensual sexual relationship with his adult daughter. The Columbia Spectator reported the news just this morning and it has already made international headlines. It’s a testament to the strength of the incest taboo, not to mention our thirst for new twists on the classic student-teacher sex scandal. In this case, the 46-year-old political science professor isn’t alleged to have had sex with one of his students but rather his 24-year-old daughter, who is in the same age bracket as most of his students. What’s more, his wife is a tenured professor at the university.

It has all the sordid ingredients to supply tabloid headlines for days, but far more interesting — at least in my nerdy universe — are the laws behind this case and others like it. After all, the relationship in this case allegedly began after Epstein’s daughter reached the age of consent. It isn’t a clear-cut case of child abuse, and there are no allegations that the three-year-long relationship carried on without the daughter’s consent. Although, as we saw with Mackenzie Phillips, many argue incestuous relationships between parent and adult child can never truly be consensual. I went to law professor J. Dean Carro, who defended a noteworthy case in which a man was convicted of incest for having sex with his 22-year-old stepdaughter, to better understand how our legal system tackles this near-universal taboo.

Generally, in cases like this involving “consensual activity within the home,” it comes down to the question of whether the government has “a compelling state interest” in regulating the activity. “Some courts recognize that the government does have an interest in regulating incestuous conduct because of the risk of pregnancy and the heightened risk of genetic defect,” he says. Other courts will convict even without such a risk: In Ohio, a sexual battery statute states that a stepparent should never have sexual contact with a stepchild (and that is regardless of age). Most courts are concerned about parents preying on their children, he said. “Regardless of the age of the child, there’s still a theory that a parent is always a parent, a child is always a child and, as a result, there truly can’t be a consensual sexual act.” That explains why the daughter isn’t charged in this case. “The idea is the perpetrator is the parent and the victim is the child. We don’t normally prosecute a person falling within the protected class, and you remain a member of the protected class even above age of consent.”

The prosecution of “consensual” adult incest is relatively rare because most cases often don’t come to the surface. “Unless somebody becomes aware of it, it occurs and people never report it,” he said. When it is reported, it’s usually because the other parent finds out about it, he said. And, if it involves someone in any way connected to fame or prestige — an Ivy League school, say — you can guarantee the media will find out about it.

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Kreutz Ideology and Kreutz Religion advocate the patriarchy, which is the rule by mature men. This is, of course, gender politics. Gender politics is natural. Feminism also is gender politics. But feminism is whimsical.

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Revealed: 'Lolita' isn't just a classic novel; Nabokov's story of sick lust really happened

Vladimir Nabokov's novel is a totem in modern literature, an unflinching look at a monster who has been able to hide behind his education and manners. But it's also more than a classic of 20th century literature. Writer and editor Sarah Weinman has published a long, powerful piece of historical reportage about the largely unknown real story that inspired Nabokov's tale.

11-year-old Sally Horner entered a Camden, N.J., Woolworth's more than 60 years with the intention of stealing a 5-cent notepad. She was 11 years old and the thievery was her initiation into a girl's club. Instead, it would prove another, far more sinister initiation. "On the afternoon of June 13, 1948, she had no idea a simple act of shoplifting would destroy her life," Weinman writes in Hazlitt, an online magazine owned by Penguin Random House.

A middle-aged man wearing a suit and a fedora stopped Sally as she left the store. "I am an FBI agent," he told her. "And you are under arrest."

The man, Frank La Salle, was not a G-man. He was an ex-con and sometime mechanic. And a pedophile. He would kidnap Horner, telling her she had to accompany him to Atlantic City to avoid going to prison for shoplifting. Over the next year-plus they would cross the country, ending up in California. Throughout, he forced himself on her sexually while pretending to be her father. "That five-cent notebook didn't just alter Sally Horner's own life, though," Weinman writes. "It reverberated throughout the culture, and in the process, irrevocably changed the course of 20th-century literature."

Horner's tragic story hit the country's newspapers in 1950. Five years later, Nabokov's novel about charming Humbert Humbert and 12-year-old Dolores Haze (a.k.a., Lolita), his sexual obsession, began to arrive in bookstores. Nabokov, having had his manuscript rejected by multiple prosecution-fearful publishers, loathed being asked to explain "Lolita." Which was fine. Plenty of literary critics were willing to explain it for him, rightly or wrongly.

Elizabeth Janeway, reviewing the book for the New York Times in 1958, called it "one of the funniest and one of the saddest books" she'd ever read. The Atlantic magazine, also in 1958, wrote that "there is not a single obscene term in 'Lolita,' and aficionados of erotica are likely to find it a dud."

This was true enough as far it went. Aficionados of horror, however, would be enthralled. The language isn't obscene when compared to a pornographic text, but it certainly is when the reader remembers that the narrator is a middle-aged man mooning over a 12-year-old girl. Then Humbert's "gagged" discomfort as her "legs twitched a little as they lay across my live lap," will make you want to gag yourself. Writes Nabokov:

I stroked them; there she lolled on in the right-hand corner, almost asprawl, Lola, the bobby-soxer, devouring her immemorial fruit, singing through its juice, losing her slipper, rubbing the heel of her slipperless foot in its sloppy anklet...

On and on it goes, until Humbert Humbert sees himself -- just maybe, just for a moment -- as he really is, forcing him to let out "the last throb of the longest ecstasy man or monster had ever known."

"I want my learned readers to participate in the scene I am about to replay," Humbert tells his audience. And we do, such is the beauty and power of Nabokov's prose. We sink luxuriously into Humbert's perversity; we even -- dear God -- understand Humbert's lust, his need.

The New York Times' Janeway believed that was the point, "to underline the essential, inefficient, painstaking and pain-giving selfishness of all passion, all greed -- of all urges, whatever they may be, that insist on being satisfied without regard to the effect their satisfaction has upon the outside world. Humbert is all of us."

And so Frank La Salle, the real-life monster who defiled Sally Horner, must be all of us as well, even though he had none of the sophistication of his fictional alter ego. Nabokov saved newspaper clippings about the case, which he scribbled detailed notes on, but his debt to the defining experience in Horner's life -- and perhaps the defining experience in La Salle's life as well -- remains largely unknown to the reading public. A 2005 Times Literary Supplement essay pointed out that Horner's story "reads as a rough outline for the second part of 'Lolita.'" A biography of Nabokov mentions Horner in passing. But the real little girl has never really surfaced. Weinman isn't surprised:

"Packed as 'Lolita' is with countless other allusions, leitmotifs, and nested meanings, excavating a real-life case wasn't top priority for Nabokov scholars. Sally's plight was written up extensively in local newspapers at the time, but the New York Times never bothered, and eventually, even the hometown media (in Camden, N.J.) forgot about the case."

Maybe it's just as well. Lolita -- Dolores -- has a short-lived victory of sorts in the novel, escaping Humbert and thus sending her abuser into an emotional free-fall. They inevitably meet up again, and this time Dolores, though poor and pregnant, has the upper hand. "She is now an entirely different person," writes Janeway in the New York Times review, "a triumph for the vital force that has managed to make a life out of the rubble that Humbert's passion created, and the monster's mindless activity merely confirmed."

Horner never had an equivalent triumph. She would eventually break away from her abuser and be reunited with her family, but she had trouble adjusting. Weinman points out that decades before the Elizabeth Smart and Jaycee Dugard cases, there was little understanding of the mental state of kidnapped adolescents. Newspaper readers at the time surely wondered why Sally didn't escape earlier: after all, she even went to school during her time with La Salle. "Whatever Sally has done I can forgive her," Horner's mother apparently told a UPI reporter.

Weinman expertly lays out Horner's reentry into "normal" life. Sally had to officially state that La Salle was not her father, which he insisted he was. "My real daddy died when I was six and I remember what he looks like. I never saw this man before that day at the dime store," she said. La Salle was convicted and sent back to prison, but ultimately this did not mean much to Sally Horner. She had been irrevocably damaged. She would come to a tragic end not long after La Salle's conviction -- until being reborn, just a couple of years later, in Nabokov's novel. Ever since she has been a "girl immortalized, and forever trapped," by Nabokov's brilliance -- and her own bad luck.

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Dictatorship is the only honest political system. Rulers rule for their own benefit, or maybe (maybe!) the interests of a ruling class. That is why warlordism is the political system of the future.

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