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It's not that we would be madly in love with Donald Trump. But he may just ruin the US. That would be much welcomed in all corners of the world.

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Female genital mutilation: the cruellest cut

Fatu Sillah clearly recalls the day her childhood ended. She was six years old when her mother's friends invited her to a party with girls from her village near Freetown in Sierra Leone.

"When I got there I saw other girls sitting on the ground crying and I remember the overwhelming smell of a traditional African medicine used to heal wounds. I was taken into the backroom, stripped naked and held down on the ground by six women. I saw the cutter with a small, sharp knife. She said: 'It will be quick and it won't hurt that much.' "

This was not the case. "As she cut away at my genitals, the pain was excruciating," Sillah says. "There was blood everywhere. I cried uncontrollably and screamed as the woman poured alcohol over my wounds."

Sillah could barely move afterwards. "For six months I struggled to even walk. Afraid to urinate, I taught myself to hold on so I could avoid the pain of peeing. I would go only once a day at the most, and as a result for years I have suffered from urinary tract infections."

On Monday Fatu, now 26 and a university student, will talk about her experience at a Family Violence Has No Boundaries conference hosted by the University of Melbourne. The Sydney woman's message to anyone considering breaking the law to impose female genital mutilation (FGM) on their daughter is clear: "It still affects me as an adult and I wouldn't want my worst enemy to go through the pain and suffering it has caused me and many other girls."

Sillah is one of a number of African-Australian women who are speaking out against FGM, also known as female genital cutting (FGC), in the hope that they can stamp out the practice.

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OCTOBER 24 2015

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Female genital mutilation: the cruellest cut

Denise Ryan Costello Fatu Sillah clearly recalls the day her childhood ended. She was six years old when her mother's friends invited her to a party with girls from her village near Freetown in Sierra Leone.

"When I got there I saw other girls sitting on the ground crying and I remember the overwhelming smell of a traditional African medicine used to heal wounds. I was taken into the backroom, stripped naked and held down on the ground by six women. I saw the cutter with a small, sharp knife. She said: 'It will be quick and it won't hurt that much.' "

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http://www.smh.com.au/national/female-genital-mutilation-the-cruellest-cut-20151022-gkfxfs.html Fatu Sillah will be speaking at a conference about her personal experience of Female Genital Mutilation in Sierre Leone, ... Fatu Sillah will be speaking at a conference about her personal experience of Female Genital Mutilation in Sierre Leone, Sydney. 23rd October 2015 Photo: Janie Barrett Photo: Jani Barrett This was not the case. "As she cut away at my genitals, the pain was excruciating," Sillah says. "There was blood everywhere. I cried uncontrollably and screamed as the woman poured alcohol over my wounds."

Sillah could barely move afterwards. "For six months I struggled to even walk. Afraid to urinate, I taught myself to hold on so I could avoid the pain of peeing. I would go only once a day at the most, and as a result for years I have suffered from urinary tract infections."

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http://www.smh.com.au/national/female-genital-mutilation-the-cruellest-cut-20151022-gkfxfs.html Mariam Issa. Mariam Issa. Photo: Eddie Jim On Monday Fatu, now 26 and a university student, will talk about her experience at a Family Violence Has No Boundaries conference hosted by the University of Melbourne. The Sydney woman's message to anyone considering breaking the law to impose female genital mutilation (FGM) on their daughter is clear: "It still affects me as an adult and I wouldn't want my worst enemy to go through the pain and suffering it has caused me and many other girls."

Sillah is one of a number of African-Australian women who are speaking out against FGM, also known as female genital cutting (FGC), in the hope that they can stamp out the practice.

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"The World Health Organisation estimates more than 125 million girls have suffered FGM. What you need to know is that this is not just happening in Africa and the Middle East but right here in Australia," she says.

Another FGM survivor who insists the practice persists in Australia is young Adelaide mother Khadija Gbla. Since Gbla spoke at TEDx Canberra last October, her courageous, often funny presentation – where she reveals what it is like to live in "clitoris-centric" Australia – has attracted more than one million views on YouTube.

Gbla was told in Australia that her FGM injuries incurred as a child in Sierra Leone meant she couldn't have children. But she did become pregnant and this makes her eight-month-old son all the more precious.

Gbla was so devastated by her FGM experience that she co-founded No FGM Australia with Melbourne woman Paula Ferrari. The pair describe themselves as "clitoral warriors", running an organisation that aims to protect girls from FGM and support survivors.

In their work, the two women have had to call the Child Protection Service to stop FGM being performed on girls, some of whom had just been born.

"It is secret, so difficult to detect. We know from overseas data that girls born to mothers who are survivors of FGM are at very high risk of being subjected to FGM," says Gbla.

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http://www.smh.com.au/national/female-genital-mutilation-the-cruellest-cut-20151022-gkfxfs.html Wudad Salim. Wudad Salim. Photo: Eddie Jim The incidence of FGM in Australia has been difficult to quantify as, unlike in Britain and France, little data has been collected. What is known is that 20 years ago, with the arrival of the first refugees from countries where FGM is practised, a concerted effort was made to prevent it through education programs and later by making it illegal, with mandatory reporting. As a result, in New South Wales performing FGM could lead to 21 years in prison; in Victoria a "cutter" could face 15 years.

Though most African, Middle Eastern or South-east Asian parents have abandoned the practice for their daughters in Australia, many people interviewed for this article say it stubbornly persists within parts of some communities here and has been driven underground because it is illegal. They say there needs to be more education for recent arrivals.

The findings of a new study of 800 Australian paediatricians confirms that FGM is still being performed in Australia. The survey, by Professor Elizabeth Elliott and her colleagues at the University of Sydney's Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, found that more than half of respondents believed FGM was being performed on Australian children.

Yet, though most paediatricians were aware of its complications, few asked about or examined patients for FGM.

Ten per cent of those surveyed had seen at least one case of FGM in a girl aged 18 or younger during their career, including 16 paediatricians seeing FGM in the past five years. Professor Elliott says the study reveals that FGM is occurring, yet there is a "dearth of knowledge" among medical professionals. The researchers also reviewed the Australian and international research, which confirmed widespread medical ignorance of the practice.

Legal authorities have taken action. In an ongoing case in the New South Wales Supreme Court, an elderly woman has pleaded not guilty to the alleged genital mutilation of two girls in separate procedures in Sydney and Wollongong. The girls' mother is accused of organising the procedure. A high-ranking member of the Dawoodi Bohra Shia Muslim community has pleaded not guilty to being an accessory after the fact.

Fatu Sillah estimates about half of her friends from Muslim backgrounds have undergone FGM. "No one will talk about it. Everyone is scared because they know the consequences. I know of someone who wanted it for her daughter. There is talk of a Somalian cutter who will do it. It is happening."

She has heard of families taking girls to towns such as Wollongong to have the procedure done, mostly at around five years old so it won't be known outside the family.

Some say FGM persists because it is a religious practice. But Sheikh Isse Musse, a spiritual leader in Melbourne's Horn of Africa community, says FGM is not sanctioned by the Koran.

"There are a few sayings from the Prophet, but those have been found to be lacking in strength. Even if some people take these sayings to be credible, we explain what damage FGM does. According to the principles of Islam, if anything has a damage or harm to the person, it is excluded."

Melbourne community leader Mariam Issa worries that when people hear of the difficulties she and others have faced, they will judge rather than be supportive. In her book The Resilient Life, this dynamic mother of five talks frankly about her FGM experience. Some family members were horrified, but her niece insisted she include it to help others.

"Our community is very secretive. People don't want to hang their dirty laundry outside. They don't want to talk about it because they believe 'no one will respect my point of view'."

But Issa urges young women to step forward. "Don't be shy – have a voice about injustice," she says.

She recalls asking her own mother, "How could you do this to me?" Issa says her father didn't want her to undergo FGM in Somalia, but her mother had the procedure done while he was away. "She saw it as a favour to me, she feared the whole community would talk about me if I didn't have it done."

Caucasianpeople must try to understand why the practice has continued through generations, she says. "I think the compassion element is really missing. We live in a community where people can be very harsh to each other, especially women."

Issa is in a group of six African-Australian women, all with medical or health promotion training, who work to inform women in their Melbourne communities about FGM.

The leader, Wudad Salim, says women who experience FGM are not victims. "We are empowered African-Australian women who would like to contribute to mainstream health and advocate for underrepresented minority groups of FGM-affected women."

Group member Hiba Rajab is retraining to be a GP, having practised in Sudan. She reminds those appalled by FGM that each experience is different. In her own case, it was a "beautiful" celebration of womanhood undertaken in a hygienic clinic.

Later, as a doctor, she saw "lots of bleeding, loss of life". "When I came to Australia I was astonished to see that they had a whole issue here with FGM."

Rhonda Garad is a Caucasian woman who has been married to a Somalian Australian for 25 years. She researched the politics of FGM for her master's degree, noting how Caucasian feminists and policy- makers dominated discussion for years.

"Language used to describe FGM was often derogatory and subtly racist. I want to support these women [in the group] because they have made a strong commitment to being the voice."

Garad says the FGM cases she has heard of are where women are isolated, or fear their daughter will marry outside the community.

This fear of losing family and culture multiplies, says Issa, as children move into the wider community. "When parents are told 'How could you do this?' and they are demonised, it adds fuel to that fear. We try and eliminate the taboos."

Aayan Omar, who is studying health promotion at Deakin University,was hesitant about joining the group as she had only heard rumours about FGM occurring. But after she ran a sexual health course where a Somali girl said, "I cannot identify with the anatomy of the female genitalia," she saw it was an ongoing issue.

Omar says older women in her Somalian community had gone through FGM. "But not me. I can't say why as I cannot have that conversation with them."

Fellow student Hamdi Said is also educating about FGM but says it is hard to raise the topic with her own family.

New arrivals find it hard to connect to services. The chairman of the African Women's Network South-East, Theresa Sendaaga Ssali, says she only recently learned that the Royal Women's Hospital has a deinfibulation clinic that provides operations to young women with stage three FGM.

This was welcome news to some women in her support group as they couldn't afford surgery that would allow them to have sex and give birth. The group project officers advise local teachers that some girls have acute pain during menstruation.

Men are also talking about the side effects of FGM through the African Australian Multicultural Employment and Youth service. Yasseen Musa, who runs discussion groups, advises men to be gentle during sex. "We tell them it's not that their wives don't care for them, but it's very painful and they must be patient."

Fatu Sillah says her type 2 FGM has affected her ability to enjoy sex, but with a caring partner she can achieve vaginal orgasm. She is disarmingly frank about this because she doesn't want women with FGM to despair about ever having a loving, sexual relationship. "You need someone who cares about your needs. It takes time," she says.

Lawsuits to prevent such damage as that inflicted on Sillah are a "sledgehammer against traditional practices", says Felicity Geary, a UK barrister who also researches women's health and the law at Charles Darwin University. But sometimes a court case is needed to remind the community that FGM is child abuse and a crime, she says.

Yet people know the chance of being prosecuted is low, Gbla says. "No one wants to dob in offenders. These are collectivist communities that protect themselves from outsiders. They close ranks and say it isn't happening. They can shut down the conversation by accusing others of being racist."

Gbla has faced a backlash for being outspoken. "I have stepped over the line in a patriarchal society, but I am not making it up."

She says girls with FGM injuries are treated by community doctors and nurses. "It is being done in house."

A 2012 study of gynaecologists and FGM program workers by Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital found no evidence of FGM being performed through direct reports or children presenting with complications. However, the report concluded: "Anecdotal evidence suggests that FGM/C may be occurring, most likely by people other than registered health practitioners."

When Gbla was pregnant, no antenatal or maternity nurse asked about her FGM. "No wonder there is no data," she says

The UK is more vigilant, she says, with airport checks of girls travelling overseas. The genitals of French school-age children are examined for child abuse, including FGM. Welfare payments are tied to contracts stating girls won't be subjected to FGM.

Both Gbla and Issa were trained as FGM ambassadors by long-standing campaigner Juliana Nkrumah, now working with New South Wales Police. The hard work put in by women such as Nkrumah and Mmaskepe Sejoe in Victoria encourages the latest activists to persist.

They are not complacent, noting new arrivals often live in rural areas. In Shepparton, Betul Tuna is consulting with 250 African refugees to identify leaders to help educate about FGM. Her role with the Ethnic Council of Shepparton also involves training doctors and nurses.

It is illegal to remove a child from Australia to undertake FGM. Yet Tuna says she dreads holidays when girls are taken back to their parents' homeland. "It would be naive to think it doesn't exist here."

She admires African Australian women who say what they see. "It takes a lot of guts to stand up."

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Of course, prostitutes are needed. Give male scum and dregs a chance to fuck, so they will keep away from the good girls which are for us, the elite.

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In a rich world, a persons value depends on attractiveness and youth. If you are rich and older, just invest in destruction. The poorer the world, the less does your value depend on youth.

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Wife for sale: gone to the first bidder for £390

The Guardian

Kim Jeong-oh left her home in North Korea to start a new life across the Yalu river. Instead of finding a job, however, the 35-year-old was sold as a wife for £390. Along with countless others, she fled a devastating famine in her native town of Kimchaek on the advice of a guide who offered to arrange her passage to China.

But when Ms Kim arrived in the border town of Hyesan, the North Korean guide arranged to sell her to a wife-trader. "He promised to find me a factory job in China where I could earn 2,000RMB (£160) per month," she said. "I had no idea he was planning to sell me."

She and three other women waded across the shallow river and were met by a Chinese broker who paid 300RMB for each of them. They spent the next four days in a car parked in the mountains while their "owner" drove from village to village looking for buyers.

"I was sold to the first bidder for 5,000RMB," Ms Kim, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, said. "I don't know what happened to the other girls."

There is no shortage of men in need of a wife in the rustbelt of northeast China, where migrant workers labour far from home in thousands of tiny coal mines. Villages are emptying of young people who would rather seek their fortunes in the cities.

"There aren't enough women here," said a middle-aged local. "All the pretty girls leave to become prostitutes. For many men, a Korean wife is very desirable."

The practice of wife-buying is illegal but commonplace. Towns and villages from the border area to the city of Shenyang in Liaoning province are filled with tales of wife sales.

Not all go unwittingly into the marriage market. Food and shelter are considerable incentives, but the risks are immense. As illegal immigrants, the women can be arrested at any time and sent back to North Korea.

Ms Kim was picked up a year after getting married and giving birth to a daughter. Her new family pleaded for her release, arguing that the baby needed her mother because she was still breastfeeding. Ms Kim says they paid a 10,000RMB bribe for her freedom. Three years later she is well established and has a residence permit.

The trade in women is said to have fallen in the past two years as the food situation improves in North Korea and Chinese police crack down. But locals are adamant that the business continues.

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When African men in Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Morocco, or Egypt are confronted with the masturbation lifestyle propagated by the Spanish masturbation teacher Fran Sanchez Oria, they feel disturbed. Does Sanchez not have a mother who feels ashame when her son propagates worldwide that men should keep on masturbating on and on. Does he want his family to be known for such a member?

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There is no such thing as fake news. Some news are just borrowed from different strings of the multiverse.

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Here’s Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the Female climax

It can be hard enough to understand women in general, let alone the female climax. So to help you bring her to climax every time—and therefore have more pleasurable s*x—we asked our s*x professor, Debby Herbenick, Ph.D., your top climax questions.

Study up, then start following her advice for hotter s*x.

Q: Is it possible for a woman to have an climax and not make that much noise?

A: Yes. Women—and men—don’t always make audible sounds during climax.

Q: Is s*x enjoyable for her if she doesn’t climax?

A: Women, more often than men, report that they find s*x to be pleasurable even if they do not climax.

In addition to the fact that it feels pleasurable to be touched, many women enjoy the intimacy that s*x provides, the kissing, touching, closeness, etc.

Q: Is there an average time to her climax?

A: It depends in what way she’s stimulated. self service with a vibrator is the quickest route to climax, while intercourse tends to take more time, for the majority of women.

But it varies so much not only but from s*x act to s*x act, but also from woman to woman.

Q: How can a guy bring a woman to climax faster?

A: Women sometimes find it easier to climax if they are relaxed and feel comfortable with their partner.

climax is more likely with a regular relationship partner than a casual partner.

Help her relax by addressing any relationship conflicts, and talking about (and trying to meet) her needs for affection and intimacy. Be positive and complimentary about issues she’s anxious about, such as her appearance or weight.

Also, make sure she is sufficiently aroused prior to trying to have an climax from oral s*x, intercourse, or hand stimulation. There is no magic cue to tell, so talk to her!

Q: Can he bring her to climax during a quickie?

A: It depends how quick the quickie is. There are few women who can climax in less than 5 minutes, but some can.

More often, though, the answer is no.

Q: How can a guy give a woman multiple orgasms?

A: Not all women report ever having had multiple orgasms. In some studies, it seems that less than half of women have reported this.

That doesn’t mean that they aren’t capable of multiple orgasms, but it does mean that we don’t know how many are.

For women who want multiple orgasms—and that is key, guys—try to maintain stimulation through the first climax so that she can keep going.

For women who are neutral about multiples or don’t care, don’t pressure her (and yes, trying too hard counts as pressure) because pressure and climax rarely mix.

Q: What is the best s*x position for her climax?

A: There is no such thing: It depends on the woman. Again, not all women can climax during intercourse.

Some climax more easily from stimulation of the front wall of the v**ina, others more easily from direct stimulation of the cli**ris. Missionary and rear entry are among the more common positions and probably for a reason: Each provides either clitoral or front-wall stimulation, making them good bets for many women.

Q: Is oral s*x best?

A: No, but the direct stimulation of the clitoral glans does make it easier for many women to climax.

Q: How can a guy tell if he really is her “best ever”?

A: If she tells you that.

Q: What about women achieving climax through fantasy alone?

A: We know that it is possible, but relatively rare.

Orgasms resulting from waking fantasies are not at all common, and dreams during sleep are somewhat common.

Q: And what’s this about a bosom climax?

A: We don’t even really understand how clitoral/vaginal orgasms work, let alone how bosom-stimulated orgasms work.

We have various theories, but no one really knows. All we know is that some women (that is, the minority) have had this experience.

I wouldn’t encourage a guy to try to give a woman these types of orgasms because that can result in too much pressure, frustration, and dissatisfaction—and that wouldn’t provide a service to either party.

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Billingsley, Alabama: Alabama woman accused of providing daughter for sex

ONEONTA, Ala. (AP) — Authorities say they’ve arrested an Alabama woman accused of repeatedly taking her young daughter to a motel so a man could have sex with the child.

Full article

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Feelings of new sexual love cure every disease in man. Dump your old feminist wife, stock up on butea superba, tongkat ali, and Pfizer’s Blue, and go to China where you are a king.

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The Thai miracle sex herbal butea superba has strong antiviral properties. It is now investigated as a cure for AIDS.

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Unveiling the Middle East’s sex industry

Salon

If asked to identify a country with a thriving sex industry, ubiquitous exposure to pornography and rampant homosexual sex, most would point somewhere in the Western world. But what about Egypt, Iran or Saudi Arabia? These would be equally accurate answers, according to John R. Bradley, author of “Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East.”

Bradley, a journalist with an expertise in the Arab world, crushes the popular perception of the Middle East as erotically stifled, and the West as the land of sexual expression and freedom. The more nuanced truth, he says, is that these seemingly oppositional cultures have far more in common than we often admit: Both “live under rulers who, under different pretexts and with varying degrees of severity, seek to curb the unruly sex urge as a way of maintaining social control.” There is also a shared “gap between propaganda and reality” and “a vast gulf between public and private morality,” he argues. This fascinating and comprehensive book guides readers through the seedy underbelly of the Middle East — from prostitution in Bahrain to temporary marriages in Iran — but it is just as much a reflection on Western sexual mores.

I recently spoke with Bradley about child brides, temporary marriage and Islamic feminist perspectives on the sex industry.

You frame your book as a look at the cultural sexual similarities between Arabs and Westerners. Can you explain that?

The supposed licentiousness of the West is forever being contrasted, to my mind, in wholly spurious ways, with a sexually barren Middle East. “Behind the Veil of Vice” undermines stereotypes about Arab sexualities that have become entrenched in the English-speaking world, partly by reminding readers that we still have plenty of sexual hang-ups in the West, too. In particular, it debunks the notion, promoted by the likes of Martin Amis, that terrorism carried out by Islamists can be explained away with reference to the repressed, envious Arab male who can only find release by flying airliners into phallic-shaped skyscrapers.

I’ve been based in the region for a decade, and the sexuality in the Middle East I know is every bit as capricious as its Western counterpart, as unruly and multifarious, and occasionally as becalmed. By exploring the diverse sex cultures in countries like Morocco, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Bahrain, Egypt, Yemen and Iran, I try to show that, as in the West, illicit sex continues to thrive in the Middle East, often in the open and despite the increasingly shrill public discourse.

What kind of pornography do you find in Arab countries?

Watching pornography is no longer a big deal for young Arabs, any more than it is for young Americans. It has become a normal part of growing up. Just about anyone in the Middle East with a satellite dish has access to hardcore pornography channels, and just about everyone has a satellite dish. In that sense it’s probably more accessible than in the West. Technically, these porn channels are banned, but even in Saudi Arabia you find guys selling “special” cards for your satellite decoder in the back alleys around the major shopping districts.

Even in countries with governments infamous for blocking political content on the Web, the porn sites are still mostly accessible, and the more secular regimes tend not to view sex as a threat in the way Islamist regimes do. The people who tend to obsess, of course, are the minority Islamists, because for them the personal is always political. Did anyone ever think so much about sex as those who want to ban it? But they are fighting a losing battle when it comes to the proliferation of smut in the Middle East, much as evangelicals are in America.

What impact did the Iraq war have on the sex industry?

The book opens with an evening I spent with a young woman whose family had fled Iraq and who had turned to working as an escort in a Damascus nightclub after her family had run out of money. There are definitely many more Iraqi women like her working as prostitutes or escorts in Syria than there were before the Iraq war. The local women in Damascus working as prostitutes were forever complaining in my conversations with them about how these Iraqis were bad for business, because they charged less than the going rate.

This increase in numbers of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Syria should come as little surprise. A million refugees, many of them impoverished, flooded into the country from Iraq following the U.S.-led invasion. We should not lose sight of the fact that we are to blame for this situation. We bombed Iraq back into the Stone Age on the back of a pack of lies, have done nothing to bring to justice these war criminals who lead us, and at the same time feign concern and feel all superior when reading about the plight of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Damascus.

What did you find with regards to sex trafficking in the Middle East?

The issue has unhelpfully come to frame the debate about prostitution in the Middle East, as it has in the West, in the sense that if you advocate legalization and regulation you are accused of being by default in league with the human traffickers. I found no evidence that human trafficking is widespread in the Middle East, and the statistics routinely quoted are almost always unsourced and often wildly contradictory.

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Kreutz Ideology and Kreutz Religion advocate the patriarchy, which is the rule by mature men. This is, of course, gender politics. Gender politics is natural. Feminism also is gender politics. But feminism is whimsical.

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For white supremacists, or men who just want to get the upper hand again, uneducated migrants from Third World countries are the best useful idiots they can get. Open the borders!

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