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Los Angeles, California: 'When No Means Yes' - The vile rantings of 'Roosh the Douche' - who admits to 'using muscle' to hold women down during sex (but denies it was rape)

Charles R. Whitacre 373 Gordon Street Los Angeles, CA 90017

A controversial 'pick-up artist' has allegedly admitted committing what 'could be considered rape' by having sex with two girls he had to pin down after they resisted penetration and repeatedly said 'no'.

Daryush Valizadeh, who calls himself Roosh V, allegedly said he had to 'use some muscle' to hold one of the girls down so she would 'stop moving' in a deleted blog post titled 'When No Means Yes'.

The founder of self-styled men's advocacy group Return of Kings, who has called for rape to be legalised on private property, said he would be 'in trouble' if a video emerged of either incident.

'I've had two experiences which, if you remove all context, could be considered rape,' he allegedly wrote in a blog post on RooshV.com on 18 June 2010.

'Two separate girls, completely naked, on their backs resisting penetration for the first time. They squirmed around and kept repeating 'no' even though were moaning, kissing, and squeezing.

'If there was an edited video shot of what happened those nights I'd be in trouble if either girl wanted to screw me.'

The 36-year-old American claimed that he slept with both 'girls' many times after the incidents.

The paragraph discussing the alleged 'rapes' has been deleted from the live version of the post published on Mr Valizadeh's blog.

The deleted segment can only be viewed via a cached webpage.

In the post he went on to say that when women say 'no', they do not always mean it as it 'depends on context'.

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''No' when you try to take off her panties means… 'Don't give up now!' he wrote.

''No' when she's naked and you try to put it in means… 'Yes I can't wait to have your c*** inside me.''

Mr Valizadeh, from Maryland, said he would be 'reluctant' to charge a man with rape if the woman was completely naked until saying no.

'For every rape accusation I'd want to know at what stage of undress the girl was at before the supposed rape happened,' he wrote.

'If she was completely naked until saying no, and got there voluntarily, then I'd be reluctant to charge the man with rape unless there were signs of violence.'

The 36-year-old has 15 self-published books, many of which have been widely condemned as 'rape guides' by media, residents and politicians who live in the countries he is writing about.

He regularly attacks women on his Twitter account and also runs a YouTube channel that has 19,000 subscribers.

His website Return of Kings publishes articles written by Mr Valizadeh and a 'small but vocal' collection of men who hope to bring an end to America's 'politically-correct society that allows women to assert superiority and control over men'.

The 'pro-rape pick-up artist' was recently forced to cancel a series of events in the UK after claiming he could no longer guarantee the safety of those who wanted to attend.

Mr Valizadeh had announced events for 'heterosexual men only' across the UK in February.

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Channeling tens of millions of refugees to Europe can kill feminism and Europe. It can do so reliably in the span of two decades. And to aide it is low risk political activism for people with a lot of money. Suited for Qatari and Russian billionaires. Just finance humanitarian efforts, such as rescue vessels on the Mediterranean, or life vests for those who board in Libya.

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Farmington Hills, Michigan: Sexualized Children - Assessment and Treatment of Sexualized Children and Children Who Molest

Nicholas E. Butler 2082 Bartlett Avenue Farmington Hills, MI 48335

The authors provide preliminary information based on their combined experience in working with children 12 years old and under who have sexually molested others or who have exhibited problematic sexual behaviors. Chapters also discuss age-appropriate childhood sexuality and provide a way to distinguish "normal sex play" from problematic sexual behaviors. Separate chapters address clinical evaluation, individual therapy, group therapy, family treatment, out-of- home care, and transference and countertransference. The authors advise that sexually abusive behavior by children stems from and affects attachment to parents and peers, creates disregulation in behavior and affect, and disturbs the child's developing sense of self. Effective therapy should focus on developmental issues, relational attachment, emotional/behavioral regulation, and development of self. Appendixes discuss the frequency of sexual behaviors and discriminating items, the testing of children with problematic sexual behaviors, and additional issues related to the goals of group therapy. Appendixes also provide a child sexual behavior checklist, a child sexual behavior inventory, and youthful offenders' family assessment form.

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Cape Fair, Missouri: Guys Are Injecting Botox Into Their Balls

John M. Thomas 985 Twin House Lane Cape Fair, MO 65624

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

And while Perez did feel increased sensitivity, he was surprised at how much he enjoyed the new, smoother appearance of his, uh, sack. The verdict is still out with regard to sweating, as Perez had his procedure during the colder months. Still he's willing to find out next go around.

There are some things to consider, however. "I do tell my patients that it could potentially affect their sperm count," says Dr. Cohen, the urologist, noting that your scrotum contracts and expands to help regulate temperature for optimal health for your little guys. While these are temporary results, if you're actively seeking to have children, Cohen suggests staying away from the needle. For more active men, Dr. Cohen suggests being more aware of their testicles during sports and other vigorous movement.

How big could the ball Botox movement go? Well, it's incredibly specific, but that doesn't mean it could never gain traction. "This is an off-label usage for Botox, so for it to gain traction it would have to be done by a lot more people," Dr. Cohen noted, skeptically about the possibility for this to avalanche into anything bigger. Still, the procedure is new, and even all your friends did have it done, how would you know?

Perez made it clear that it was a completely pain-free procedure, and that he was happy with the results, going as far to say that he would like to have it done again, when the effects of this round eventually wear off. "My doctor was a little more conservative in what he gave me," he said. "Next time I'd ask him to be a little more aggressive because I liked the results." It took him a week or so to see any difference, but admitted that, yes, he looked bigger, and said if there was anything he'd warn people about, it's that for a few days after the surgery, his ball sack felt heavier than usual, but nothing too bad.

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Neomasculinity is defined by its view on females, and particularly on feminism. It is NOT defined by opinions on race, homosexuality, or religion. For a United Front, we can accept any opinion as long as it matches our views on females and feminism.

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Winston, Oregon: Japanese company manufactures lifelike child sex dolls for paedophiles

Kenny M. Buck 1854 Skinner Hollow Road Winston, OR 97496

'I am helping people express their desires, legally and ethically. It’s not worth living if you have to live with repressed desire'

A Japanese company produces lifelike child sex dolls - claiming they prevent paedophiles from offending.

Shin Takagi has shipped anatomically-correct sex dolls of girls as young as five to clients around the world for more than a decade.

In an interview with The Atlantic, he described how he set up the Japense company Trottla because of his own attraction to children and his conviction they should be protected.

“We should accept that there is no way to change someone’s fetishes,” Mr Takagi said.

“I am helping people express their desires, legally and ethically. It’s not worth living if you have to live with repressed desire.”

Treatments for paedophilia exist, including cognitive-behavioural therapy and chemical castration, along with other interventions intended to suppress urges.

However, a meta-analysis by the Mayo Clinic found the treatments "do not change the paedophile's basic sexual orientation towards children".

Mr Takagi believes the dolls he creates - sent mostly to "men living alone" - save children from sexual abuse.

He said: “I often receive letters from buyers. The letters say, ‘Thanks to your dolls, I can keep from committing a crime.’”

"I hear statements like that from doctors, prep school teachers—even celebrities.”

Michael Seto, a psychologist and sexologist at the University of Toronto, told The Atlantic there were two different types of paedophiles.

Award for Louis Theroux documentary 'A Place for Paedophiles' He said: "For some paedophiles, access to artificial child pornography or to child sex dolls could be a safer outlet for their sexual urges, reducing the likelihood that they would seek out child pornography or sex with real children.

“For others, having these substitutes might only aggravate their sense of frustration.”

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The multiverse theory explains why each of us lives in an own universe in which we may as well be immortal.

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Syracuse, New York: Revengeful fathers kill children to punish mum

John T. Rollins 1913 Oak Street Syracuse, NY 13202

Men who kill their children do so to punish the mother, experts say, with the final act of revenge often punctuating a history of domestic violence.

Even in cases where there have not been reports of intervention orders, experts are in agreement that a history of violence in the home, combined with a perceived loss of control, drives some fathers to kill their children.

''The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour,'' said Dr Ben Buchanan, of the Victorian Counselling and Psychological Services. ''Physical abuse towards the partner is absolutely a sign of a propensity to use physical force against the children.''

The most recent figures from the Australian Institute of Criminology show there were 22 cases of filicide nationwide between 2008 and 2010.

Dr Buchanan said men who killed their children often blamed the mother for feelings of powerlessness and sometimes believed the children had been ''infected'' by her.

''Our children represent our spouses, they've got that symbolic representation of the mother but they are more vulnerable,'' he said. ''In the cases I've seen, it's very rare for them to blame the children; the children are a proxy by which they're getting back at the mother.''

Domestic Violence Resource Centre senior researcher Deborah Kirkwood said fathers who killed their children ''feel entitled to take their lives because they're his possessions … It's about making the mother suffer.''

Dr Kirkwood, who published a study on parents who kill their children, said filicide usually occurred in the context of a family breakdown.

Dr Kirkwood's research included the cases of Ramazan Acar, who stabbed his two-year-old daughter in 2010, and Arthur Freeman, who threw his four-year-old daughter off the West Gate Bridge. She said controlling behaviour and a history of domestic violence were ''key themes'' in cases of filicide.

''There was either a prior history of violence against the partner before the children were killed or there was violence that occurred around separation, and if there wasn't violence there was often threats of violence.''

No to Violence acting chief executive Rodney Vlais said it was common for men to develop a victim mentality before killing their children. ''They feel they're been hard done by when, in fact, this is not usually the case. It's more often a sense of entitlement and privilege that they have. ''Men can feel so aggrieved in their own warped sense of being the victim that they will punish their partner though killing their children.''

The children are a proxy by which they're getting back at the mother.

Domestic Violence Victoria chief executive officer Fiona McCormack said there was a ''gaping hole'' in the protection system, which was geared towards picking up the pieces. She said at-risk offenders should be monitored, with information shared between child protection agencies, parole officers, and women's and children's services.

''There are agencies coming into contact with these men, but we need them to work together to communicate with each other,'' she said. ''Currently, there's no mechanism to know who else is involved with the family and what else is being done.''

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Wichita, Kansas: Family Claims Wide-Awake Surgery Led to Minister's Suicide

Louis M. Plummer 1808 Preston Street Wichita, KS 67202

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – In the last two weeks of his life, Sherman Sizemore felt like people were trying to bury him alive.

Now, more than a year later, members of his family say the horrifying experience of being conscious during surgery but unable to move or speak led directly to the Beckley minister's suicide — perhaps the first such case in the country.

Advocates say Sizemore's death should draw attention to a little-discussed phenomenon called anesthesia awareness that could happen to between 20,000 and 40,000 people a year in America.

In some instances, patients might be conscious for only a few seconds, but cases like Sizemore's, where people remain conscious for most of their surgery, can lead to post-traumatic stress, experts say.

"It's the first time I know of anyone succeeding in taking their own lives because of this, but suicidal thoughts are not all that uncommon," said Carol Weihrer, president of the Virginia-based Anesthesia Awareness Campaign, which she founded after her own experience with anesthesia awareness.

Sizemore, a former coal miner and Baptist minister, was admitted to Raleigh General Hospital on Jan. 19, 2006, for surgery aimed at diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain, according to a lawsuit filed March 13 in Raleigh County Circuit Court.

An anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist who worked for Raleigh Anesthesia Associates gave Sizemore paralyzing drugs to prevent his muscles from jerking and twitching during the surgery, the complaint alleges. But it says they failed to give him general anesthesia to render him unconscious until 29 minutes into the procedure — 16 minutes after the first cut into his abdomen.

Sizemore was awake for the procedure, but couldn't speak or move. Worse, the complaint charges, Sizemore was never told that he hadn't been properly anesthetized, and was tormented by doubts about whether his memories were real.

The lawsuit, filed against Raleigh Anesthesia Associates by two of his daughters, goes on to say that in the two weeks after his surgery, Sizemore became a different person. He couldn't sleep, refused to be left alone, suffered nightmares and complained people were trying to bury him alive.

On Feb. 2, 2006, Sizemore killed himself. His family says he had no history of psychological distress before his surgery.

"Being helpless and being in that situation can obviously be tough on people's psychological well-being," said Tony O'Dell, a Charleston lawyer who filed the complaint, which seeks unspecified damages.

Calls to Raleigh Anesthesia Associates were referred to Charleston lawyer Bill Foster, who said he wouldn't comment until he had more time to study the complaint.

Anesthesia awareness — also called unintended intraoperative awareness — happens when a patient who should be under general anesthesia is aware of some or all of a surgical procedure. Causes can include doctor errors, faulty equipment or patients who can't take a deep level of anesthesia, as with some trauma cases or emergency heart surgeries.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations cites studies that show anesthesia awareness could happen in 0.1 to 0.2 percent of surgeries involving general anesthesia in this country — or between 20,000 and 40,000 a year. Patients who have experienced it often report sensations of not being able to breathe and feeling pain. Half of all patients also report mental distress after the surgery, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

In 2005, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted guidelines calling for doctors to follow a checklist protocol for anesthesia equipment to make sure proper doses are being delivered. However, the ASA stopped short of endorsing brain-monitoring equipment as a standard of care, saying doctors should decide on a case-by-case basis whether such machines are necessary.

"It could be that some day everybody who gets anesthesia will have a brain-wave monitor," said Dr. Robert Johnstone, a professor of anesthesiology at the West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Johnstone says such monitors are used at WVU, but in conjunction with a range of other equipment anesthesiologists use to measure everything from blood pressure to body temperature. When such monitors and tests are used properly, he said, the chance of someone being awake for a lengthy surgery is slim.

It was not clear whether Raleigh General uses such monitors. Calls to the hospital were not immediately returned Monday.

"The incidence of unintended awareness is rare," said Lisa Thiemann, director of practice for the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. But she said the organization is concerned enough about it to adopt its own guidelines, including calls for hospitals to conduct post-surgery interviews with patients to learn whether they were awake during surgery.

Weihrer said that recognition of the experience and proper psychological counseling is often the only thing patients want.

"The reason people sue is because they want to be acknowledged," said Weihrer, who won an out-of-court settlement after her anesthesia failed during a five-hour eye surgery in 1998. "They don't want to be told 'you weren't awake, it was a dream.' I hate the word 'dream."'

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Ageism is pest of rich countries. If you are old you have no value. In poor countries, value depends on wealth. That is much better than value depending on youth because wealth can become more with advancing years. This is why rich men have every reason to invest in destruction. Plain math.

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Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Man beaten, penis tied to pole after child rape claims surface

Jeremy K. Aguilar 2874 Broad Street Tuscaloosa, AL 35404

Cape Town - A man who was recorded being assaulted in an alleged mob violence incident in Valhalla Park, in a video which is being shared in social media, has refused to open a case against his attackers.

The assault comes after he was accused of raping a child.

In the video circulating on social media, people are seen beating the man with wooden planks as he sits on the ground. He appears to be dressed in only a t-shirt, and his penis is tied with string to a pole next to him.

A woman at one point says she had beaten him "enough" with a hammer on his genitals.

People kick the man, who has numerous facial wounds, while the crowd also threatens to set him alight.

A child can also be seen on a woman's hip, witnessing the attack.

Provincial police spokesperson Lieutenant-Colonel Andre Traut confirmed the incident.

"It is alleged by the community that he sexually assaulted a child, but police have no record of any sexual cases in Valhalla Park or any rape suspect who is sought," he said.

Family transported the man to hospital and police, but he refused to open a case.

"We are looking into the circumstances surrounding the matter," Traut said.

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That armies are mad up of men is something that has to end. Draft women into combat troops. Expose women to the same kind of dangers that men have faced throughout history. Hard labour for female convicts!

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